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Larry Sanger Blog: Comment ne pas se servir d’Internet, 1. la distraction est un problème

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Larry Sanger contre le techno-fatalisme (celui, pessimiste, de Carr aussi bien que celui des « ravis » du net). Premier billet d’une série à suivre.

Ce que je considère comme un vice immodéré a été complaisamment décrit comme « multi-tâches », comme si s’autoriser à être distrait était une sorte d’habileté technique avancée.

L’idée  que le bric-à-brac écervelé de ce début de siècle est comme seront toujours les choses les choses à partir d’ici est hautement discutable.

via Larry Sanger Blog » How not to use the Internet, part 1: it’s a problem that the Internet distracts us.

Larry Sanger Blog » How not to use the Internet, part 1: it’s a problem that the Internet distracts us
http://larrysanger.org/2012/04/how-not-to-use-the-internet-pt-1-its-a-problem-that-the-internet-distracts-us

  • What I think of as an unmitigated vice has been complacently described by some as “multi-tasking,” as if allowing yourself to be distracted were some sort of advanced technical ability.
  • The nature of these now-common problems—a mind ironically made poorer in spite of, indeed by, the Internet’s riches—has been much discussed, for example by Maggie Jackson in Distracted, Mark Bauerlein in The Dumbest Generation (a much better book than you might expect from the title), Nicholas Carr in The Shallows, and Jaron Lanier in You Are Not a Gadget.
  • We read about “revolutions” throughout history, the printing press, of religion, of ideology, of industry. This is another one; it’s the real deal. It’s more important than, for example, who will be elected president in 2012, whether the Euro will collapse, or Iran’s nuclear ambitions.
  • Maybe it’s time that we started taking stock of the Internet’s candy store more like mature adults and less like sugar-crazed children.
  • Some people won’t admit that there is even a problem in the first place. They celebrate the Internet uncritically, leaping upon every new site, app, or gadget that promises to connect us in newer and deeper ways. But it is precisely the wonders of the Internet that we celebrate that have become a major distraction. Some people don’t seem to want to admit that distractability is a serious problem; they do nothing but offer blithe predictions and analysis of how thinking, social interaction, education, etc., are moving into a wonderful new age.
  • Other people seem to think that there’s nothing that can be done about our distractability and “shallowness.” Whatever their disagreements, Internet commentators Clay Shirky and Nicholas Carr seem to agree on this: the brevity of information chunks, the pace of their flow, and the fact that they are mediated democratically by giant web communities are all inevitable features of the Internet; so we can’t help but be “distracted.”
  • I can’t help but observe that this sort of techno-fatalism might be why some Internet geeks are becoming anti-intellectual.
  • I love the new universal accessibility of so much recorded knowledge. Over the last dozen years I have been a booster of this myself, and in my work I still aim to enlarge our store of free, high-quality knowledge resources. I also deeply love the free exchange of ideas that the Internet makes possible. These things are why I “live online” myself. I do agree with the boosters that all this will, in time, probably, change us for the better. But the idea that the mindless digital helter-skelter of the early 2000s is how things will always be, from here on out, is highly doubtful.

Written by cercamon

22 avril 2012 à 11:11

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